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TRUMP CARES – By Helping Job Creation, Helping To Feed Starving Kids, Making A Difference

Trump knows business, having enjoyed  an ultra-successful career as a business person.  He knows jobs, having created thousands of jobs during his long career.  Trump has learned how to deal with people, all kinds of people during this time.  He understands finance and economics and how to negotiate deals.  He knows business, and who can deny that being president, running the country, is like running a big, very big, business. So his experience in business has prepared him for the presidency like no political job ever could.

Trump has also endorsed a network marketing business in past years, not currently since he entered the presidential race, which in turn  supported a charity that helped feed hungry children.  By endorsing this business he helped people to improve their lives by helping them to own their own business, create more time for themselves and become independent, and in the process helped to provide food for starving kids, all as part of his effort to help people get a new start in life.  It’s what Trump is all about.  This was nothing new for him.  He had been doing it for years.  It’s what he called, rightfully so, making a difference.   I have personal knowledge of all that, being a member of that network marketing business myself.  So TRUMP CARES.  He cares about people, he cares about the country, he cares about you.

No one can take any of that away from him, not for a moment, certainly not Crooked Hillary, who knows nothing about job creation, nothing about finance or economics, nothing about making deals, or about success in anything.  She is corrupt, incompetent,  and a world-class liar.  She should hang a sign around her neck that says, “I am a fraud – don’t vote for me.”  For once in  her life, she’d be telling the truth.  Hillary has also collected money, millions of dollars from foreign powers paid into the Clinton Foundation over the years, for her services, her favors, as Secretary of State.  You know what that makes her?  They have a name for it, not used in polite company.  I don’t have to say it.  But facts are facts, they are things, as John Adams argued in the famous Boston Massacre trial of 1770.  You have to deal with them.  This entire scheme is an arrangement that just reeks of corruption and is well deserving of an FBI investigation in and of itself.

Yet Crooked Hillary still  claims she is qualified to be President.  Amazing!  Of course, she’s getting help, lot of it, from the liberal, very liberal, mainstream media.  They are crooked too, as claimed by Trump, and rightly so.   They have a duty to report news accurately, but they don’t.  They distort everything so far as Trump is concerned even falsify things, and they shouldn’t.   It’s an abuse of the constitutional guarantee of freedom of the press.  But they are scared to death that Trump will win.  They should be scared, because he will win.

Copyright©2016.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

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Filed under active voice, clear writing, good diction, history, sound sentence structure, tips for good diction, Writing Improvement

Follow These Techniques To Sharpen Your Writing

In today’s world of global communications, the written word is more important than ever before.  Clear writing is your key to success in any endeavor.  Use of clear writing guidelines and techniques will increase job opportunities for you as well as help to advance your career if you are already employed.

Following the tips listed below will put you on the road to writing improvement. As you use these tips, remember that writing is no different than any other undertaking in life – you have to start at the beginning to master it.  All art is created through the exercise of a craft such as painting or sculpting.  Every craft must be taught and learned, including writing.  Clear writing is an art form because it can be learned through the craft of writing.  Almost everyone can write to some degree but to write clearly is a goal worthy of achievement.  The long hours and hard work it may take to get there are tasks eminently worthy of the effort.  Remember that a clearly written document will speak as well of the author as the purpose it seeks to advance.

Know your reader.  If you don’t know who you’re writing for, you may as well not write at all.

Know your subject matter.  Become a maven on the content of your writing.  You need expert knowledge to write with authority on any subject.  If you try to fake it, your reader will see right through you.  Take the time to research your subject matter thoroughly.  The result will be high quality content, a vital ingredient for any successful writer.

Write in a conversational tone.  This doesn’t mean engaging in meaningless chit-chat in a serious letter such as a job application but try to avoid overly stiff, formal writing.  A relaxed, conversational style should be what you are seeking.  This tone of writing will become apparent to you the more you write – and read.

Be concise.  When I was in Toastmasters years ago, we relied on a simple mantra to guide our thinking about speechmaking:  stand up, speak up, shut up.  The same idea applies to writing: say what you have to say in as few words as possible.  Avoid wordiness.

Be consistent.  Use grammar, punctuation, capitalization, etc., in a consistent manner throughout your writing to avoid having the reader believe that you are a careless or sloppy writer.

Use less jargon, i.e., words that are particular to a specific trade or profession.  Use of words that you may know but are unfamiliar to the reader may cause the reader to see you as a pompous writer and to view your writing with suspicion.

Avoid vague or big words.  Be specific.  Write in plain, ordinary English to avoid reader frustration.  The word “cool” is often used in today’s conversation but it’s too vague and abstract to be useful in clear writing.  Use “end” instead of “terminate,” and “use” instead of “utilize.”  Sharpen your word selection by resorting to an unabridged dictionary.  Also, avoid an overly general use of words, which is the product of a lazy mind.  A good writer uses specifics to encourage visualization and the formation of word pictures in the reader’s mind.  Stronger writing will always use definite, specific language because it will be far easier for the reader to understand a concept when the reader’s mind can form images.

Use short sections.  The sight of long, dense, unbroken text is intimidating to a reader.  Break it up into shorter sections with a good topic sentence at the beginning of each section.  Your reader will be very appreciative.  In the same vein, keep your sentences shorter.

Prefer the active voice, i.e., express action directly.  In other words, to borrow a thought from the legendary songwriter Johnny Mercer, you should “Accentuate the positive” in your writing.  More specifically, the active voice makes it clear who is supposed to perform the action in the sentence.  When using the active voice in a sentence, the person who’s acting is the subject of the sentence.  When the passive voice is used, the person who is acted upon is the subject of the sentence.  The active voice eliminates ambiguity about responsibility for action; the passive voice obscures that responsibility.  For example, “You need a special permit to fish in that lake,” is better than “A special permit is needed to fish in that lake.”  More than any other writing technique, use of the active voice will improve the quality of your writing.

Following these techniques will help make your writing clear and persuasive.

Be positive in your approach to writing.  Don’t assume it’s time consuming or unimportant.

All of the writing tips appearing on this blog and on previous blogs on this site may be viewed under one cover in my book, “The Art of Clear Writing,” which is available at amazon.com in print or on Kindle.  The book and my two Civil War articles are featured on my website at http://www.agregardie.com.

Copyright © 2013.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

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Filed under active voice, clear writing, good diction, punctuation, sound sentence structure, tips for good diction, Writing Improvement

The Economy Needs You To Join The Skilled Work Force

Everybody needs to make a contribution to improving the economy.  You can do your part by learning to write more clearly.  This may seem like a small contribution, but it’s an important one, and every little bit helps.

Learning to write more clearly will help make the work force more effective.  Making the work force more effective will help the economy grow.  That’s the bottom line.

Last week’s blog alluded to the need to have a skilled work force to help move the economy ahead, a topic touched on in the presidential debate on October 3.  One of the 5 points urged by Mitt Romney was to have a skilled work force to encourage the growth of small business.

This is a crucial point because the growth of small business is badly needed as a means of reducing the country’s unemployment burden.   Small business employs a huge number of workers and creates two thirds of the jobs but without lower taxes and less regulation, growth in small business is stifled.

Education is a vital key to reach the goal of increasing employment. Without doubt, education includes learning to write clearly.  To put it differently, clear writing is a goal unto itself, but education in the form of learning how to write clearly, is a means to that end.  To continue that thought, small business needs a skilled work force to succeed, and without the ability to communicate clearly, any work force is at a disadvantage. I’ve said it before on this blog site, but it bears repeating:  the power of the written word is more important today than ever before.  It’s your key to the future.

My eBook, “The Art of Clear Writing,” is all about writing clearly.  It is designed to improve the clarity of writing for all those who feel their writing needs improvement.  The eBook opens with a story about Doris Day’s lawsuit against her former lawyer, Jerry Rosenthal.  I was head of the defense team in that case.  The court found that Rosenthal had his faults so far as his representation of Doris Day was concerned, but he nevertheless was an experienced and effective legal writer.  He had a 3-step routine that he followed for any writing project: he always carefully planned what he was going to write, made it a point to find and use the right words to fully express his thoughts, and thoroughly reviewed and edited his writing before pronouncing it “done.”  The eBook is available at amazon.com/kindlebooks and can be previewed free of charge.

These are key lessons to learn for anyone who believes their writing is substandard.  They are important steps to take on the road to developing confidence in your writing.  The underlying proposition of my eBook is that because writing is an art form, it can be learned.  But you need the desire and dedication to do it.  If you’re willing to put in the time, the rewards will come.  Even if writing is not your strong suit, you can still learn and significantly improve your writing ability by starting with the three lessons mentioned above.

Another important writing feature extolled in my eBook is that good grammar can be learned by word association.  It’s not necessary to memorize grammar rules to learn to write clearly, although memorization may still be necessary to pass examinations.  Memorization has little effect on understanding the context with which words are used.  The best expression of thoughts through good grammar can be learned by observing the association of the right word with the appropriate context in a sentence.  The emphasis should be on training your eye to carefully observe how grammar is used in putting sentences together and to constantly practice what you have learned in your writing.  This approach requires training the eye to recognize correct word association through extensive reading, and regular practicing of your writing.  I have had personal experience with this approach.  It has worked for me; it can work for you as well.

The ability to communicate clearly is vital for job placement, career advancement, earnings potential, and business success.  There is no better time to undertake the task of improving your writing. Start today. The economy needs your help.

Copyright © 2012.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

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Filed under clear writing, Writing Improvement

Poor Spelling Is Anathema To Clear Writing – And The Economy

Mastering the subject of spelling may well be the single most difficult task confronting you on the road to clear writing.  But, correct spelling is, without doubt, a goal worthy of accomplishment.

This point must be made absolutely clear:  misspelled words will cause all of  your hard work to sink – fast.  So, be forewarned!  It is absolutely imperative to make sure your spelling is correct.  Misspelled words in particular are the bane of good writing; nothing will undermine your hard work and turn a reader off faster than a misspelled word, particularly if it’s a common one.

Revising and editing any writing as part of the polishing process is a definite must. This is also a good time to double check for spelling errors.  (I always proofread for spelling errors as I am writing.)  You must take the time to check the spelling of any word that looks suspicious to you. It’s a good idea to put a question mark over each word you have doubts about while you are writing, then go back and check the spelling on each word you marked.  Resorting to a dictionary for new or difficult words should be the first and ongoing choice.

You can become a good speller if you go about it in the right way, but don’t expect overnight miracles.  Remember the basic rules, such as i before e, except after c.  There are exceptions to even that rule, however, such as leisure, seizure, financier, species, neither, either, height, and weird.

Many writers shortcut the correct spelling of words either because they don’t know their correct spelling or are too lazy to find out.  Spelling “nite” instead of “night,” and “thru” instead of “through” is the result of careless, sloppy, or lazy writing and is disfavored in good writing.  Don’t take any shortcuts with your spelling; they will stamp you as an amateur.

Another solution is to record all misspelled words on a separate sheet of paper; the act of writing down the correct spelling should in itself help you remember it.  Keep this paper handy for continued reference and add to it on a regular basis.  Try to understand why each word was misspelled.

Spelling by ear and by careful pronunciation can also help improve your spelling.  Exaggeratedly careful pronunciation and spelling the words in syllables may also help.

You can also master the intricacies of good spelling through visualization.   Make full use of your eye in learning to spell.  Train your eye to observe printed words accurately.  This approach is closely akin to learning good grammar by word association, as explained in my eBook, “The Art of Clear Writing,” available on amazon.com/kindlebooks.   Good golfers are said to visualize each shot before hitting it.  If it works in golf, it can work in spelling.  Teach yourself to picture the correct spelling of all misspelled words in your mind.  Concentrate on the correct spelling of these words to be sure you see every letter. Then look away, spell the word, and look back for verification.  Repeat this procedure on a regular basis until you can instantly recognize the correct spelling of each previously misspelled word.

A related trouble spot is the use of the wrong word in place of the correct word.  Thus, except (to exclude)and accept (to take) are often confused, as are affect (to influence) and effect (to accomplish),and allusion (a reference) and illusion (a deceiving appearance).   When a confusing resemblance between two words causes you to misspell one of the words or to erroneously use one instead of the other, a good remedy is to focus your attention on one of the words, learn its spelling and correct use thoroughly.  Use any memory device for this purpose, as long as it works.

It is important to bear in mind that poor spelling may well derail your efforts to find a job, or advance your career.   It can also mean lost sales for your company.   This bodes ill not only for you or your business but for the economy as well.  The ability to spell accurately is but another step on the road  to achieve clarity in communications, which is a vital ingredient not just for your success but for the economic success of the country.  Rebuilding the country’s infrastructure (roads, bridges, etc.) often mentioned as a means of  creating more jobs, also applies to rebuilding the pathways of communication between people.

Don’t forget to check out my website at www.agregardie.com.

Copyright © 2012.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

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Filed under clear writing, Writing Improvement