Monthly Archives: September 2014

Forgetting Cleveland – The City, Not The Convention

I’m back from my recent network marketing convention.  It was my first trip to Cleveland, Ohio.  If I have anything to do with it, it will be my last.  Cleveland is  an old, run-down, and dreary city.  That old saw, “The Mistake By The Lake,” (Lake Erie, that is) still applies.  One of the cabbies noted that the city has done little in the way of restoration.  Justification for that comment was quite evident from just looking around.   During the Saturday lunch break at the convention, we walked several blocks looking for some place to eat.  We wound up going back the the convention center because everything we saw was overflowing with lunch seekers.  But the point is we walked past one dreary, old fashioned building after another.  Very depressing.  The next convention will be in Phoenix, AZ, however, which should be a different story altogether.

But the convention itself was a success.  It always is.  The continuous excitement and energy pouring out from some 25,000 attendees  packed into the Quicken Loans Center  (known locally as the “Q”) was overwhelming.  The speakers offered  sage advice on how to improve business.  The testimonials provided by those recognized for success so far this year was inspirational.  Some of the people who were recognized  only spoke broken English, but they had become very wealthy.  So the money I spent on the convention was money well spent.

If I can  reduce the weekend’s information into one golden thought, it would be this: to make professional money, you must develop professional skills.   This means personal skills as well as business skills.  Personal growth and development is just as important, perhaps more so, than skill in running a business, although  it can probably be argued that the two go hand-in-glove.  The founder of the company I’m partnered with remarked that his personal growth has been instrumental in the growth of the company.  One book relied on heavily for personal growth is Napoleon Hill’s classic, “Think and Grow Rich.”  I strongly commend this book to anyone who has not read it.  It is a book which not only should be read but studied.

One of the more exciting aspects of the company is that it now operates in Mexico.  This is a huge new market which I am trying to exploit.  I think development of this aspect of the business will also go a long way to strengthen Mexican-American relations by providing the common Mexican “man on the street” with an opportunity to make extra money by owning his/her own business.  This is one of the aspects of this network marketing business that truly excites me, i.e.,  making a difference in the lives of others.

I also met an individual  attending the convention who had an inspirational  life story.  He’s still a young guy, I think in  his late twenties or early thirties, who spent several years as an iron worker and then as a boxer.  Down on his luck money-wise, he turned to network marketing to improve his financial circumstances and has done very well.  He was quite interesting to talk to and provided some useful information on how he built his business.

In closing, let me add one other thought that I have mentioned in previous posts.  The network marketing business not only can be personally rewarding but it helps the economy by reducing unemployment.  So you can be  making a difference in the lives of others and also helping the country as well.  This is an unbeatable combination.   This is a truly remarkable business, one that should be seriously considered by anyone seeking to change his/her life.

Copyright©2014.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

 

 

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On My Way To Cleveland, Ohio

Next weekend I’ll be traveling to Cleveland, Ohio to attend one of the international conventions hosted by my network marketing partner.  I consider it  part of the business I’m involved in, part of the commitment I’ve made to succeed at this business, to attend this convention.  It will be my first trip to Cleveland, so that will be a new experience.  But, for that reason,  it will not be possible for me to post a blog here next week.

After practicing law in California for over forty years, network marketing is a new challenge for me.  I got into it at the behest of my oldest son, who is also in the business, to help him escape the financial constraints  of teaching.  One of the exciting aspects of the business is to be able to help others change their lives by becoming independent business owners.  Helping a client start a new business when I was practicing law was always a rewarding  endeavor for me.  Now I can do it all over again in my network marketing business.

Many, many years ago when I was in prep school in Pennsylvania, I took a course in English writers.  One of the writers I studied was John Keats.  Keats was not with us on this planet very long.  He died of tuberculosis at age 26.  That was back in 1821.  There was no cure for it in those days.  But while he was here he wrote some memorable poetry and one of the poems was “On First Looking Into Chapman’s Homer.”  It was Chapman’s translation  (Chapman was a writer himself who lived in the 1600s) of  the epic Greek poet Homer (who lived around 700-800 BC and is famous for the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey”) which excited Keats so much.  He described his excitement in this poem as akin to that of an astronomer watching a new planet swim into his field of vision, or that of Spanish explorer Cortez when “with eagle eyes” he stared out upon the vast expanse of the blue Pacific.  The network marketing business is likewise an exciting experience and it provides vast opportunities for personal and financial growth.  Excuse me for going a bit overboard, but you get the idea.

I’m also reminded of the Los Angeles blender salesman who one day got an  order for blenders from a small hamburger shack in San Bernardino, about 90 miles East of LA.  He drove out to San Bernardino to deliver the blenders and look at the hamburger shack’s operation himself.  He found a business that was a model of simplicity.  All the little shack  served was  hamburgers, fries, and shakes.  He also saw a business that was easily duplicated.  The blender salesman, whose name was Ray Kroc, bought the little hamburger shack, decided to keep the shack’s name, McDonald’s, and the rest is history.  I only mention this story because my business is also simple in operation and easily duplicated.  This is the key to growing the business.

It’s not just the potential financial rewards that motivate me in this business.  It’s also the personal satisfaction from the thought that I’m actually helping the economy by reducing unemployment.  I have often voiced my extreme displeasure with the current occupant of the White House for being someone who is not only unqualified for the job of being president but is incompetent to boot.  The continued stagnant economy in this country marked by high levels of unemployment attests to that unpleasant fact.  So I feel I’m doing my part by helping others to move ahead financially despite the shortcomings of the present administration.

The company I’m in partnership with now now operates in Mexico as well as other parts of the world.  This factor provides me with the opportunity to expand not just in this country but in Mexico and worldwide.  I have also taken an increased interest in Mexico in my efforts to expand my business into that country.  Mexico is a whole new universe of opportunity.

So this is why I’m going to Cleveland.  Attending the convention will enable me to keep up with developments in the network marketing business, hear firsthand from eminently successful business leaders, and to share in the excitement from being a part of a huge and ongoing industry.

Copyright 2014.  Arnold G. Regardie.  All rights reserved.

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